Bird Families

Olive Euphonia / Euphonia gouldi

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Lowland jungle birds

"Why are you showing everything, and showing these birds from Costa Rica?" - you say. - "Everyone is tired of watching them! Tell me something else." And I will answer like this: "I want to tell my friends what birds you can see in a particular place of this country. And it is to show these birds, and not to list them with a boring list. Although the list will eventually work out too, but how long is it not soon will happen!"

This is an introduction. And we continue the story about the low-lying selva of the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica. All these birds are from there, from the territory of Selva Verde Lodge.

This slash-tailed trogon (Trogon massena) we met on the bank of the Sarapiki River. He sat in the depths of the tree, but the tree could be approached. And I found a point from which the whole bird was visible.


Trogonov are separated into a separate order of birds Trogoniformes with a single family of the same name. I have seen these birds in North, Central and South America and in Africa. In Asia, I photographed only one species of bird. I still cannot understand why Asian species are much less common than birds of other continents.

We have already talked about the feeders of this hotel, located near the two-story restaurant. I will show several birds from these feeders.

Large saltator (Saltator maximus), a representative of the Cardinalov family (Cardinalidae). A couple of saltators visited the banana feeder in the morning.

Olive back euphonium (Euphonia gouldi). Found in Costa Rica only on the low-lying Caribbean slope. This is a male, when he appeared, it was completely dark.

The female is distinguished by the color of the forehead. According to the latest trends in taxonomy, all euphonies are now in the Finch family (Fringillidae).

Not all birds visited the feeders for the treats laid out on them. River singer (Parkesia noveboracensis) was looking for food on the track not far from them. This northern migrant belongs to the Arboreal family (Parulidae).

In preparation for the trip, I read dozens of berdard reports on various locations in Costa Rica. I knew that the most amazing heron lives on the Sarapiki River - the Solar (Eurypyga helias). It was said that sometimes it is very rare to see her from the bridge over the river. Imagine my surprise when, in the dawn darkness, this "heron" also paraded along the path near the feeders. I was absolutely delighted with this bird.

A couple more phrases about this bird. The sun heron is the only member of the family Eurypygidae... An ancient primitive group of the Crane-like order, closest to the kagu (inhabitant of the island of New Caledonia). There are many similarities with shepherds. The external resemblance to heron of storks is, apparently, convergent.

Note - Sergey volkov_serge rightly pointed out to me that with the modern taxonomy of birds, herons are in the order Pelicaniformes. I took information from Kartashev's book "Systematics of Birds" in 1974, the information from it is partially outdated. But now I will always remember what kind of relatives the herons have now.

Links to other parts of the stories about Costa Rica can be found here.

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