Bird Families

Jumping Macquarie Parrot / Cyanoramphus erythrotis

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There are 300 species of the order of parrots. Parrots are easily recognized by their short, curved beaks, large heads, short necks and legs. On the feet, two toes are facing forward and two toes are facing backward, which helps them collect seeds and climb trees. All parrots have a loud and often shrill voice. Some species are distinguished by the imitation of the sounds they hear. Parrots are flocking birds, so in captivity they imitate their masters in the form of social behavior and just to take time. A developed mind is especially noted in African gray parrots, Amazons, and macaws.

Appearance
Parrots do not have certain common beak characteristics and differ significantly in appearance. Their sizes can vary from 10 cm (dwarf parrots from New Guinea) to 1 m in hyacinth macaues from Brazil, the majority of which is a developed tail.

Many parrots are brightly colored red, yellow and blue, but the most common color is green, which serves as camouflage. In some species, the plumage is dim or even black.

Parrots have strongly curved beaks for eating fruits, seeds, buds, nectar and pollen. Sometimes they can eat insects or other meat. But since most still eat fruits and seeds, they have a well-developed goiter for softening food.

Parrot families

The order of parrots is usually divided into three families. Lori and lorikeets form the Lori family, and the cockatoo the Kakadu family. All other species are grouped into the true parrot family, which includes true parrots, macao, parakeets, budgies, lovebirds, nocturnal parrots, and dwarf parrots.

Spread
They live in both Americas, India, Africa, some regions of Asia. The most unusual species inhabit New Zealand, Australia and New Guinea. It turned out that some species are adapted to the "winter" climate, having mastered the spurs of the Himalayas, the highlands of Mexico. Small colonies are found in southern Europe and even in the cities of Canada, competing with sparrows and pigeons. African necklaces are found in Africa, Guinea, Senegal, Mauritania, Uganda, Sudan, and some subspecies in Ethiopia.

Parrots are mainly found in tropical forests around the world, although they can be found in the arid semi-deserts of Australia and on the cold Patagonian plateau in Argentina. Most species are daytime birds that live in trees, while others are nocturnal and remain mostly on the ground.

Parrots play an important role in the development of their habitat, contributing to the growth of forests. Since not all absorbed seeds are digested, many are dumped with bird guano into new areas of the forest. Some species consume nectar and contribute to the pollination of many plants in the rainforest.

Sex differences and reproduction
Parrots of both sexes have the same plumage in most American and African parrots, but often differ in species from Asia and the Pacific. A large difference is observed in the Electus roratus eclectus: the male is green and red, and the female is green with or without blue.

Necklace parrots exhibit sexual dimorphism when sexually mature males develop an “occipital collar” or dark ring around their necks. These changes begin to appear at eighteen months and are completed by the age of three.

Almost all parrot species are monogamous, usually mating for many years, if not their entire lives. They often gather in flocks, within which they form pairs. They can also form groups for the night.

Couples usually nest in hollow trees or live in hollows. Many species lay 4 to 8 relatively small, pure white eggs. Incubation is usually inconsistent and lasts from 18 to 20 days. Young animals develop slowly.

In African necklaces, the mating season lasts from August to November. They are slightly different from most parrots, as the female lays two or four eggs, and the male and female incubate for three to four weeks. At the same time, after hatching of chicks, the pair can break up, unlike others, necklace parrots easily form new pairs. But the Amazon, even after the death of a partner, is unlikely to find a replacement.

Life span
In captivity, some subspecies of the larger species live up to the age of 70 or 80 years. Many house birds outlive their owners. The lifespan of African necklaces is approximately 15 years. Budgerigars live for 7-8 years.

In nature, in addition to natural enemies, humans are the main threat to the life of parrots. Some bird populations are being destroyed by excessive hunting. Other species die when humans invade their habitats. Some rare species are also endangered due to the increased demand from private collectors.

Parrot taxonomy:
Currently, there are two families: parrots and cockatoos. The cockatoo family was previously a subfamily. Some taxonomists distinguish subfamilies of Loriaceae and Nestoria into separate families. There are between 316 and 350 species in these two families.

27 species and 14 subspecies in the IUCN Red List.

- Subfamily Black-billed cockatoo Microglossinae

- Subfamily Black cockatoo Calyptorhynchinae

Product description

The kakarik is the most restless parrot of all that a person keeps in captivity. The name comes from the Maori language, literally translates as a little parrot. This bird is also known as the New Zealand parrot.

Jumping Macquarie Parrot

The jumping Macquarie parrot is an extinct species of kakariki.

The species lived on the subantarctic island of Macquarie, today administratively belonging to the Australian state of Tasmania. After the discovery of the island in 1810, the parrot had a large population. In 1820, the island was visited by the expedition of Thaddeus Bellingshausen. Later, those who visited the island widely hunted parrots. This led to the extinction of the species in the late 1880s.

The parrot was classified as a subspecies of the red-fronted kakariki Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis, and was later isolated from the Reishek kakariki into a separate genus of subantarctic kakariki as a subspecies of Cyanoramphus erythrotis erythrotis. However, the Reishek kakariki, which lives on the Antipodes Islands, is often distinguished as a separate species of Cyanoramphus hochstetteri instead of Cyanoramphus erythrotis hochstetteri.

  • inhabited by birds. Until 1890, the endemic jumping parrot Macquarie, which disappeared after the introduction of cats to the island, lived on the island. Also common
  • Cyanoramphus erythrotis hochstetteri Yellow-fronted jumping parrot Cyanoramphus auriceps Antipodal jumping parrot Cyanoramphus unicolor Cyanoramphus cooki
  • Red-fronted jumping parrot or New Zealand kakariki lat. Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae is a bird of the parrot family. Body length 23 - 26 cm, tail
  • Rodriguez necklace parrot lat. Psittacula exsul is an extinct bird of the parrot family. Body length 40 cm.It was distinguished by bluish gray, not green
  • Seychelles ringed parrot lat. Psittacula wardi is an extinct bird of the parrot family. Body length 41 cm.Reminded the parrot Alexander, but was smaller
  • The Rodrigues parrot Necropsittacus borbonicus is an extinct bird of the Parrot family. The length is possible about 50 cm. It is assumed that the main color
  • Paradise flat-tailed parrot lat. Psephotus pulcherrimus is a bird of the parrot family. Body length 27 cm. Forehead, lesser wing coverts, center of abdomen, undertail
  • vol. 2 Karolinska parrot - an extinct species Karolinska parrot Karolinska parrot Conuropsis carolinensis Karolinska parrot on the site Extinct animals
  • Mauritian forelock parrot lat. Lophopsittacus mauritianus - a species of large extinct birds of the parrot family, endemic to the Mascarene island of Mauritius
  • several thousand individuals. And on the subantarctic island of Macquarie, a jumping parrot previously lived. Mostly arboreal birds live in forests, less often on
  • Mascarene parrot lat. Mascarinus mascarinus is an extinct species of the parrot family, endemic to the Mascarene Reunion Island in the Indian Ocean. Taxonomic
  • yellow. Lived in Cuba and the island of Isla de la Juventud. Until 1800, this parrot was quite widespread. However, the rapid settlement of the island, the destruction
  • naked, flesh-colored. The parrot was described by Atwood as a coveted hunting trophy - its meat was eaten. In addition, these parrots were popular as pets.
  • It is believed that this parrot was very similar to the also extinct purple Amazon Amazona violacea This parrot was first mentioned by Jean Baptiste Labat
  • lat. Aratinga labati is an extinct bird of the parrot family. A small parrot known only from the description of Jean - Baptiste Labat, made by him in 1722
  • dating back to the XVII century. from the island of Martinique. Rothschild first named these parrots Anodorhynchus martinicus. No proof of the existence of this parrot
  • guadeloupensis lat. is an extinct bird of the parrot family. By 1760, these parrots became extremely rare and soon became extinct for unknown reasons. Known
  • jumping on the ground. This coincides with the description of the mode of movement of other parrots - nestors. Soon after the settlement of the islands, hunting for gullible birds led
  • years. Mauritian forelock parrot lat. Lophopsittacus mauritianus - bird of the parrot family, subfamily true parrots Described by virtually the only
  • They often caught insects with their beaks in the air. They were very mobile and often jumped on the table to find pieces of meat there. From their burrows deep down
  • birds, like the Mascarene crested starling English. russk., mascarene parrot subspecies of the Mauritian ringed parrot, reunion sultan eng. russian
  • birds such as the red-headed Mauritian shepherd, the Mauritian forelock parrot Psittacula bensoni eng. Russian, Mauritian blue pigeon, Mascarenotus owl
  • in captivity It also followed from Buller's notes that wild goyies first jumped from branch to branch and opened their tails, and then caressed each other with their

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Amazing and cheerful VoronezhVet kakariki parrots.

Jumping parrots, or running parrots, or kakariki to the subantarctic island of Macquarie, the central range, so. Jumping parrot Macquarie Cyanoramphus erythrotis Parrots. Macquarie Island - Macquarie Island in the South Pacific Ocean Until 1890, the endemic jumping parrot Macquarie lived on the island.

MADAGASCAR CUCKOO DELALANDA COUA DELALANDEI.

Until 1890, there was even a unique jumping Macquarie parrot, which has now completely disappeared due to the established ones. Psittaciformes: Parrots. On the grassy island of Macquarie there are Australian marine rookeries. The endemic jumping parrot was exterminated at the end of the 19th century.

Macquarie island.

Running parrots, or kakariki jumping parrots Genus jumping parrot Macquarie Tahitian jumping parrot. Macquarie penguin island. Discussion on LiveInternet. The plumage of parrots consists of small and large hard feathers, but on some islands it has already died out New Caledonia, Lordhau, Macquarie, etc. Our lovers have New Zealand and jumping parrots. Parrots kakariki - photo, description, content, buy, reviews. Eider Laysan pogonush Mauritian dodo Madagascar Delaland's cuckoo Jumping parrot Macquarie Martinique.

Cyanoramphus Kakariki Songbirds and decorative birds.

Yellow-fronted jumping parrot New Zealand goat parrot Kakarik red-fronted jumping parrot Macquarie Tahitian. Seychelles ringed parrot. What. Jumping parrot Macquarie lat. Cyanoramphus erythrotis is an extinct kakariki species. The species lived on the subantarctic island of Macquarie today.

Jumping Macquarie Parrot Knowledge card.

In nature, kakariki live on the islands of New Zealand and the islands: Tahiti, Rayatel, Macquarie. In nature, parrots have a green color. Jumping Parrot Macquarie is What is Jumping. Macquarie Island in the Pacific Ocean attracts the attention of scientists and, for example, a rare bird species - the jumping Macquarie parrot. On. The order of parrots is like a kind of order of birds. Like the jumping parrot of Macquarie Island. Cyanoramphus erythrotis and the famous wandering pigeon. Ectopistes migratorius, a.

Porfiriev Averyan Averyanovich. Disappearing lonely.

Thick-billed parrot of Katerina Bolborhynchus lineola. 3987. Red-faced Jumping Macquarie Parrot Cyanoramphus erythrotis. 4244. Parrots in winter Big Voronezh Forum. Veterinary, Kakariki Jumping parrots watch, download, read, free, without Jumping parrot Macquarie Cyanoramphus erythrotis. Types of parrots A of the Amazon. Parrots on VKontakte. The jumping Macquarie parrot differed from him in a more yellow shade of green plumage, orange-red markings on the head and on the sides. On a visit ... to the penguins! Hot Beauty Spot. Until 1890, the jumping Macquarie parrot lived here, but people who came to the island left their negative mark. After.

Ara guadeloupensis. What is Ara guadeloupensis.

New Zealand mountain jumping parrot of the New Zealand Islands, or Macquarie, from which it is already close to Antarctica. Shepherd Debois Paleontology. The area of ​​distribution extends from the islands in the southern Pacific Ocean of Tahiti, Raiatea up to the subantarctic island of Macquarie ,.

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Young parrots are capable of breeding at the age of 8-10 months, on the islands it is already extinct New Caledonia, Lordhau, Macquarie, etc. Our lovers have New Zealand and jumping parrots. Amazing and cheerful Kakariki parrots. On the islands, it has already died out New Caledonia, Lordhau, Macquarie, etc. Our fans have New Zealand and jumping parrots. I saw yellow parrots with red foreheads on a bird. Delaland's cuckoo is an elegant bird that is already unrealistic. This genus of birds is also known as Jumping Parrots, or running New Zealand parrots. Contents of the article: Description.

Jumping Macquarie parrot.

Some species of birds that lived on the island, including the jumping parrot Macquarie, which was found only here. Macquarie. Kakariki watch online videos in excellent quality and without. Jumping parrot from Macquarie Island. Further study of Antarctica spanned many decades. Southern continent. Antarctic Odyssey in the Ross Sea, 32 days. Interpretations, synonyms, antonyms, translations Parrot in explanatory dictionaries and encyclopedias: Alex parrot Jumping parrot Macquarie Red-tailed parrot blue-winged blue-winged thin-billed parrot. Jumping Macquarie parrot with comments. Seychelles Ringed Parrot Wikipedia article of the free Jumping Macquarie Parrot Mascarene Parrot Martinique Amazon.

What animals became extinct in the next 200 years? Answers.

Honey bells, ice skates, red-fronted jumping parrots, Distant Macquarie Island is renowned for its breathtaking variety. Birds of the Antipodes Islands Candy Tour is the best trip. Macquarie Island eng. Macquarie - it is Already by 1890 the rare species of jumping Macquarie parrot, living only here, completely disappeared.

Kakarik genus Parrots.

2 New Zealand Mountain Jumping Parrot Cyanoramphus malherbi † 3 Jumping Macquarie Parrot Cyanoramphus erythrotis 4 Yellow-fronted. Animals with the letter M. Which animal begins with the letter M. Species: † Jumping Macquarie parrot. International Write a review on Macquarie Jumping Parrot. Notes.

Macquarie Island LifeGlobe.

By 1890, the rare species of the jumping Macquarie parrot, living only here, had completely disappeared. Were under threat. Macquarie is an island in the Pacific Ocean. Description, climate, photo. On the subantarctic island of Macquarie, a jumping parrot previously lived. Beautiful wallpapers of parrots and photos of parrots in large. Red-fronted jumping parrot. What. Rodriguez necklace parrot. Subfamily: True parrots Jumping parrot Macquarie Mascarene parrot Martinique. Types of parrots with the letter P complete alphabetical list. Jumping Macquarie Parrot Martinique Amazon. Martinique Macaw. Mascarene parrot. Moa Sea mink. Sea cows.

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Cyanoramphus erythrotis (Wagler, 1832)

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The Macquarie parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis), also known as the Macquarie Island Parakeet, is an extinct parrot from subantarctic Macquarie Island, an outlying part of Tasmania, Australia, in the Southern Ocean. Source: Wikipedia

Detachment:
Psittaciformes
Family:
Psittaculidae
Genus:
Cyanoramphus

Scientific:
Cyanoramphus erythrotis

citation:
(Wagler, 1832)

Reference:
Abh.K.Bay.Akad.Wiss. p.426

Protonym:
Psittacus erythrotis

Avibase ID:
C792CA6E1F26A727

Taxonomic Serial Number:
TSN: 714273

Geographic range:

  • Cyanoramphus erythrotis: Formerly Macquarie I. Extinct

Sources recognizing this taxon

Avibase taxonomic concepts (current):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 01 (August 2013):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 02 (May 2014):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 03 (March 2015):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 04 (Aug 2016):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 05 (Jan 2017):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 06 (Feb 2018):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Avibase taxonomic concepts v. 07 (Feb 2020):
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
HBW and BirdLife Taxonomic Checklist v5 (Dec 2020):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (as published):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2000 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2001 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2002 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2003 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2004 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 5th edition (incl. 2005 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (incl. 2007 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (incl. 2008 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (incl. 2009 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (version 6.5 incl. 2010 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (version 6.6 incl. 2011 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (version 6.7 incl. 2012 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (version 6.8 incl. 2013 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements 6th edition (version 6.9 incl. 2014 revisions):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements, version 2015:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements, version 2016:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements, version 2017:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements, version 2018:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Clements, version 2019:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (as published):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 1.2):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 2.1):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 3.1):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 4):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 5):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 6):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 7):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 3rd edition (incl.corrigenda 8):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Howard and Moore 4th edition (vol. 1-2):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 2]
Howard and Moore 4th edition (incl.corrigenda vol. 1-2):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 2]
Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive (01/31/2015):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Handbook of the Birds of the World Alive (03/07/2017):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Handbook of the Birds of the World and Birdlife (Dec 2017):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Handbook of the Birds of the World and Birdlife (Dec 2018):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 3.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 3.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 3.3:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 3.4:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 3.5:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 4.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 4.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 4.3:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 4.4:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 5.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 5.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 5.3:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 5.4:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 6.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 6.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 6.3:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 6.4:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 7.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 7.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 7.3:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 8.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 8.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 9.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 9.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 10.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 10.2:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
IOC World Bird Names, version 11.1:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
James Lee Peters (original):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
James Lee Peters (2nd edition):
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Working Group Avian Checklists, version 0.01:
Macquarie Parakeet (Cyanoramphus erythrotis) [version 1]
Zoonomen - Zoological Nomenclature Resource:
Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae erythrotis [version 1]
Zoonomen - Zoological Nomenclature Resource:
Cyanoramphus erythrotis [version 1]

Taxonomic status:

View status: full species (sometimes a subspecies)

This taxon is a subspecies of Cyanoramphus [novaezelandiae, erythrotis, subflavescens] (sensu lato) by some authors

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